Daniel Zylbersztajn – 2015 Selektion

Some of my 2015 Photographs

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Text Selection 2015

Radio Feature DW Jewish Child Refugee  Martin Lubowski links und Frank Auerach mitte mit Kollegin (r) https://dzx2.net/2015/12/23/radio-featureworld-in-progress-jewish-child-refugee/
 die-novemberpogrome-von-1938-gallerypicture-15_620x349 Reichskristallnacht und das Volk. (English Comment) https://dzx2.net/2015/11/09/reichskristallnacht-und-das-volk/
Interview: Die Überlebende: Marina Litvinenko, the survivor

DSC02351

Marina Litwinenko (Litvinenko) (c) All Rights Reserved Daniel Zylbersztajn 2015

https://dzx2.net/2015/03/12/die-uberlebende-marina-litwinenko-the-survivor-marina-litvinenko/
Cynthia McDonald im Hintergrund, im Vodergrund Landy Richmond, mit Toechtern waehrend seiner Theraphie https://dzx2.net/2015/06/27/back-to-eden-kult-hairstylist-in-london-the-roots-of-hair-culture/ Back To Eden, London Rastafari Hair Couture from the Roots
World Capital for the Rich

1Hyde Park (15)

(c) All Rights Reserved Daniel Zylbersztajn 2015

https://dzx2.net/2015/05/05/eine-weltstadt-fur-reiche-world-capital-for-the-rich/
Leitkommentar / Leading Comment Juedische Allgemeine https://dzx2.net/2015/06/25/bds-gegen-den-isolierten-boykott-von-israel-against-the-isolated-boycott-of-israel/  israel-flag
Sind heute beide tot. Der in Berlin geborene Hans Freund, und Enkel Jeremiah Duggan (damals 8 Jahre) am Sedertisch (Bild fuer J.A. mit freundl. Genehmigung der Familie)  Der Fall Jeremiah Duggan

 

 

 

dzx2.net/2015/06/04/kommentar-zu-jeremiah-duggan-inkompetenz-der-kripo-bei-potenziellen-judischen-mordopfer-vor-12-jahren/
Nie Wieder Keine Farbigen https://dzx2.net/2015/05/12/never-again-no-coloureds-nie-wieder-keine-farbigen/

01 Staying Power Anzeige am Black Cultiral Archives in Brixton (c) Daniel Zylbersztajn

01 Staying Power Anzeige am Black Cultiral Archives in Brixton (c) Daniel Zylbersztajn

Modell des Denkmals an die den transatlantischen Sklavenhandel. Mit freundlicher Erlaubnis (c) memorial2007.org.uk

Model of the slavery memorial that was planned for Hyde Park | Modellbüste des Sklavenhandeldenkmals

A Question of Remembering https://dzx2.net/2015/04/16/eine-frage-des-nationalen-gedenkens-und-vergessens-a-question-of-national-memorialisation-and-forgetting/
Remembering Terror 1972 https://dzx2.net/2015/03/09/how-to-remember-the-terrorism-of-1972/

AND

https://dzx2.net/2015/01/11/terror-not-remembered-dont-kill-our-snow-fun-hill-a-sorry-tale-of-a-limping-democratic-intervention/

Ap_munich905_t

Picture Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munich_massacre

2013-10-19 12.08.37-1

(c) Daniel Zylbersztajn

Schuhe selbst machen https://dzx2.net/2015/01/31/schuhe-selbst-machen-in-moretonhampstead-devon-go-make-your-own-shoes/
 Ai Weiwei in London

DSC03057b

Anish Kapoor & Ai Weiwei Selfie auf dem Marsch für Flüchtlinge (8 mile walk for refugees) ! (c) Daniel Zylbersztajn

 https://dzx2.net/2015/09/21/ai-weiwei-royal-academy-london/

Claridge’s Brook Penthousesuit, Bett Foto (c) Daniel Zylbersztajn 2015

London: Von Privatbuttler bus zur  Mausefalle  (from private buttler to a mat in a tent.  https://dzx2.net/2015/09/29/von-privatbuttler-bis-mausefalle-taz-hier-mit-bildern/
Frank Auerbach, the old master

 

 

 

 

Vorherige Jahre:

Previous Years Reviews

Selektion 2014

Selektion 2013

DSC02698

Schild zu Frank Auerbachs Studio(c) Daniel Zylbersztajn

 

 

 

Selektion  2012

Andere

 https://dzx2.net/2015/07/21/frank-auerbach-the-old-master-frank-auerbach-der-alte-meister/

 

 

 

Radio Feature:World in Progress: Jewish Child Refugee

Martin Lubowski heute (83 Jahre alt) mit alten Fotos (1)

Martin Lubowski looking at pictures from Bunce Court School. Foto Daniel Zylberstajn (c) 2015 All Rights Reserved

A new radio feature on DW Radio English on Jewish child refugees to England.

Child refugees Radio DW

Martin Lubowski links und Frank Auerach mitte mit Kollegin (r)

Martin Lubowski (l) at Bunce Court in the 1940s. Next to him in the middle the young Frank Auerbach who also attended the school. All Rights Reserved, 2015

 

‘That’s the way to do it!’ Punch and Judy turns 350 – The story about my feature –

All Rights Reserved dzx2.net

Punch and Judy and and German Kasperl have not much in common or so it seems.

My latest contribution to Deutsche Welle examines this further.  DW has released

a printed version prior to the audio feature.

Feature was aired on 13th of March 2012 on World-Link (Deutsche Welle).  Please contact DW to request a copy of the podcast (E-Mail Link) if you missed it, or Read the Article on DW here!

So what on earth got me to do this feature?  It was about two years ago that I encountered Punch and Judy first with my daughter in St George’s Park, Holborn on St George’s Day.  I thought we were going to see what I knew as a Kasperl show, but was taken back when I saw Punch whom I thought to be Kasper, hit everyone of his characters.  To my amazement my daughter stomached it but I came out outraged talking to my friends about the brute Brits.  A year later on another show near Covent Garden, my daughter’s friend, they are French – Irish,  run crying away from the show, whilst my daughter quite liked it.  At the end of the show I spoke to the puppeteer, who turned out to be Geoff Felix, a Punch and Judy puppeteer of many years experience, who as I later found out kept a whole historical archive on the show.  I asked him why it was so different from the  German version and it was him who first suggested to me that actually there was such a play in Germany, but it was transformed, his real words were “sanitized” through the Nazi Reich. So this story it seemed wasn’t so much about the supposed brute Brits, but about the even more brutal Germans.

This really drew my curiosity.  I had never head such a thing.  Was it true?  I kept the idea in my head, and made sure I took all the essential details from Geoff.  I few months later I found myself in the  Munich city museum in the puppet exhibition.  And there I saw to my astonishment that in deed Kasper prior to 1932 was the villain you recognize as if you are British.

After some research and the fact that Punch and Judy’s 350th  anniversary was about to come up I pitched BBC World Service with my idea to run the story why the puppet plays would be so different in the two countries, Germany and the UK.  The BBC answered to my astonishment with “definitely not!”  It still puzzles me today why it was the BBC – who was after all are  based in Punch and Judy’s  home-country-  that  felt  the story was not worthwhile.  I wondered if perhaps they had a negative view of the show, being “violent,”  and part of  children entertainment at the sea-side.  Neither was the Sueddeutsche Zeitung in Munich interested, the paper being based near  the  home of  the German 1920’s Kasper assemble inside  the Munich City Museum.  The German weekly Die Zeit was interested, but felt the style wasn’t right, perhaps they wanted it more in a more arty way, which is quite unlike the tradition of Punch and Judy, rooted in impoverished working class puppeteering.  But my editor at Deutsche Welle called me within minutes of telling him about the idea.  He is an American living in Cologne for some time now and like any migrant has to negotiate two cultures, in his case the very differences between Anglo-Saxon and German culture that my feature attempted to investigate.

Slowly a picture began to emerge.  After speaking to Manfred Wegner from the City Museum of Munich, who oversees the permanent puppet exhibition I was just as unsettled about the civilised tamed Kasperl as I was initially about the portrayed violence of Punch and Judy.  This conflict made me contact Prof. Andrew Tolmie at one of Europe’s  leading centres in child psychology.

There are still no definite answers, but I think if one contextualize either play tradition, they both of their right place in the imagination of a child.  It is worth pointing out, that neither Punch, Polcinella, nor Kasperl at their beginnings were actually part of children theatre, but pointy and witty adult entertainment.  They evolved into the children’s genre only gradually.  Whilst violence is till displayed in every Punch and Judy, one thing that isn’t  is the once traditional use of  animals, in particular a little dog usually called Toby, nor will you find an African character that only speaks gibberish.  I was told the reason is simple.  A puppeteer plays to a live audience, if he plays things that the majority of an audience dislikes, he is out of a job.

Another comment I like to make is that the friendliness of all the puppeteers I met was remarkable and quite above the norm.  These are thinking people who enjoy entertaining children for their genuine laughter.  It isn’t always easy living, and I heard about quote a few injuries to, either to backs or shoulders, and playing puppets is quite physical, but regardless it seems that once they start playing they almost can’t stop it.  Geoff Felix said to me that there is a saying among Punch and Judy players:  If you look after Mr Punch, he will look after you!”

Punch and Judy’s 350th birthday  was celebrated at Covent Garden on 12th of May 2012.

German Kasper and Police Officer   All rights reserved dzx2.net

Older Deutsche Welle Works

Most of my features from Deutsche Welle – English Service, all produced in London are not uploaded here yet.  I simply did not have the time to transfer the old Minidisk recordings into digital yet.

However some of the feats I produced and which were broadcasted were:

  •  Spooky London.  An exploration of Ghost and Horror Stories from London.
  •  Banger Racing in London
  •  Beer Testing.  Hofbräuhaus vs London Hoxton Brewery.  Recorded on Location
  •  Mobo Awards.  Are they really necessary?
  •  Model Making.  Pastime for the Nerd or the Genius?
  • The Dybuk a Jewish Story with African American relevance.
  • African Refugee and Olympic Hope,  Ethiopian long distance runners in the UK
  • HIV and Ugandan.  Stigmatised with HIV+ in London

Daniel Z. Sept 2011

Meeting Her Majesty The Queen (aired 2000)

Queen Feature for Cool

Originally broadcasted in 2000 – full transcript follows – all rights reserved

Listen Here

INTRO:
Do you have a King or a Queen in your country? If you are listening from an English speaking country, chances are that the royal family of Great Britain was once the head of your country, or that the Queen still is your country’s head. Queen Elizabeth the Second is not only the representative head of various Commonwealth countries but also of is the head of the Church of England. All this makes her sound like a very powerful woman. Daniel Zylbersztajn went to investigate what young people in England had to say about her:

[anthem music only god safe the queen 20’’ ]

Vox Pops:

VP1 “She is gorgeous”
VP2: “ I think she makes a fairly good head of state!”
VP3: “She rules!”
VP4: “She should get a job and stop taking the tax payers money!”
VP5: “Well she is not as beautiful as our president!”
VP6: Maybe she is old, but she is cool!

[Daniel] Many ways to describe this one person her majesty the Queen Elizabeth the second, who has been Queen now for almost fifty years assuming official duties when she was only 16 years old. The Queen doesn’t only own expensive crowns kept for her in the Tower of London, she may be the richest woman in the world, owning over five billion pounds sterling. She can summon and dissolve the British parliament and is also the supreme legal power in the country. Post-boxes and coins in Britain bear her emblem or picture. But not everyone gets the honour to meet her. It are mostly distinguished and honourable persons that get to meet her. Cynthia and Mathew from Cornwall in England are two persons who met her recently. Both of them study for their A-Levels at the moment. Both of them were winners of an essay competition on the Second World War, and their first price was to meet the Queen. What better people than them, to give you a first impression of what the Queen is like.

[Cynthia] “Good Afternoon your majesty! I had to courtesy when I met her, and refer to her as your majesty!
[Matthew] You have to shake hands and say Good Afternoon Ma.
[Cynthia] When we met her she wasn’t as scary really as we thought, I don’t think!
[Matthew]She is really nice and not what you’d expect. She was really normal. She is only small as well, she is only about five-foot tall.

[Daniel] Only five foot? I always though she must be of gigantic measures, judging her powers. I asked Cynthia and Mathew what they felt the Queen was all about:

[Cynthia] The royal family serve a big purpose. They stand for Britain, without standing for politics. And they, you know, even though , the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh are really quite old now, they continue to work all the time, representing the country at some many things.
[Matthew] They are definitely a role model for everyone in England and the world really! Because everyone should aim to be like them!
[Cynthia] I don’t think that the royal family are role models for the rest of us. I think it is too much of a burden to be place on one family! But the mannerism and the behaviour of the Queen and of the Duke of Edinburgh, of the royal family, are different to em, for example leading politicians in the country.

So there you are. Well most politicians do not rule for 50 years, so of course the Queen would have a very distinguished and settled routine. For most people the Queen is still only something they see on their TV, or maybe on a post-card. Opposite Buckingham Palace, the large London residence of the Queen, there are many shops where you can buy items that de-picture the Queen Mr. Barzu is the store-owner of one these shops:

[Mr. Barzu]:
The most popular items that we sell, related to her majesty the Queen are:
Postcards, trays and mugs celebrating the golden wedding anniversary, also coronation, these items are very popular with people from abroad, especially the Germans, Australians and the Americans and the students from schools. We often see her majesty the queen driving past. Once I waved and I was greeted with a smile and I thought it was very encouraging!

Mr Barzu must have been on cloud nine for an entire week. I think he should always wear a sticker or T-shirt saying: I was smiled to by the Queen!

The Queen in Britain is still as popular as ever. In fact she has recently revamped her image and skills and even tried to understand how computers work, which is more than for many people over the age of seventy, although she is apparently not on e-mail as yet.

For Cool I am Daniel Zylbersztajn from London, leaving you with some more impressions of people on the streets of London when I asked them about the Queen:

[anthem music only god safe the queen 5’’ ]

accompanied by
Voice 1, male: God save our gracious Queen!
Voice 2, male, long live our noble Queen!
Voice 3, female: God Save the Queen

At 17” anthem Vox pops set in

VP1: She is a drag queen!
VP2: She is not the real Queen. They’re fake, they’re not the real kings and queens on this planet, she is just sitting on fortunes that are not hers
VP3: Ah, she is all right! Wears awful cloths though. She needs to get back to the sixties, when she used to wear shorter skirts, I think!

[Anthem finishes] male voice: God Save the Queen!

What the hell is banger racing?

Bangers are old cars specially designed to take part in endurance races where car fights car literally by smashing into each other deliberately…

This radio feature was aired on DW in 2000.  All rights reserved!

produced, recorded and presented by Daniel Zylbersztajn

LISTEN HERE

 

What is Music of Black Origin Anyway? Radio feature about Mobo Awards (16/11/2000)

This feature was broadcasted in 2000 on DW – transcript follows

all rights reserved

Click here to listen

At the beginning of October, London hosted the MOBO awards, MOBO standing for Music of Black Origin. It is important to consider MOBO within Europe’s and North America’s history. “Black music” supposedly means by people with a black skin colour. For years, many black artists were pushed behind. Their songs were often copied by white performers to satisfy audiences, alienated by blacks. In the eighties and nineties, attempts to label music were made, to try to correct, decades of exclusion.

MOBO supporters hold the view that the drum was invented in Africa –as most music has a drum based rhythm – most music is held to be black. But why be specific here, if, most likely, the totality of humanity originated in Africa? Different folk traditions made use of drums –not always due to an African migration.

So. can music be separated into black and white? Kanya King is one of the founders and main driving forces behind MOBO, which this years saw fames like Lauryn Hill, and Armand van Helden, both of darker complexion, and Fat Boy Slim and Emi-nem, on the lighter side of shades. With her I discussed the meaning and history of MOBO:

Kanya King: “The MOBO award was founded through award and celebrity artists involved in the broad spectrum of music of black origin and that encompasses Hip Hop R&B, Gospel, Jazz, Reggae et cetera. Basically the MOBO awards are unique because they celebrate the basis of much popular music today, as well as saluting the rich history and cultural diversity apparent in today’s multi-cultural society. It’s only been going three years, this will be the fourth year. It goes out worldwide to an audience of over a 100 Million people.

I think there became a time when I said look, I’d been to see a lot of organisations I had the door slammed in my face: “Oh look this is niche music, It’s a niche event! “ I said: No it’s not a niche event! You only have to look at the sales pattern and politics of music today and you re realising we’re defining the future of world music. You know, the acts that we’re talking’ about are securing number one global hits around the world. In a way I said, what we’re trying to do is something positive. We’re trying to celebrate the music, we’re also trying to celebrate genres that often get overlooked in other mainstream award ceremonies.”

Daniel Zylbersztajn: ”But it seems like at the moment we have a little bit of circulation from awards to awards, especially big people like Lauryn Hill, Puff Daddy is certainly somebody who has been recognised by MTV awards and what have you!!

Kanya King: “These artists feel comfortably not only n specialist charts but also in mainstream charts. So there is a lot of talent out there. We have an award called the unsigned act award. Basically what we are trying to do is to provide a platform for them. What we’re saying is, most people would wholeheartedly agree that most forms of popular music today have their roots in black heritage, and that’s what we’re doing trying to celebrate that fact. It doesn’t matter the colour or creed of an artist.. It’s a bout the music that counts.

Daniel Zylbersztajn: “African musicians in Europe are pretty much marginalised, and also would deserve an award!?”

Kanya King: “You’ve got Hip Hop and R&B, that’s African music! It started with the drum! Gospel music and Reggae music is marginalised! What we’re trying to do is say there are many forms of African music. And African music is R&B and Hip-Hop as well!

Daniel Zylbersztajn: “But why haven’t you got an award for African music?”

Kanya King: “We haven’t got an award for English music!

Daniel Zylbersztajn: “I thought that the award us called music of black origin?”

Kanya King: “Why do we need to call an award for African music when it should be either highlife or Zoot – we have a ninety minute slot and we obviously try to reflect, you know, a reggae act performance. A dance act performance, a hip-hop act performance, a gospel act performance. If we can – we only have ninety minutes of television, so we can’t reflect everything although we’d love to. It’s a very difficult choice, because what you’re trying to do is to give something have something for everyone and even though we have people say: Oh. Can we have not have more reggae acts on our show performing – you should have more dance acts, you try to reflect as much as you can, obviously with the time that you have. What’s also important is that rock music as well, we have black artists. People see that very much as a white genre, obviously you have to look where it’s come from. What we’re trying to do is to focus on music that doesn’t necessarily always get the recognition.!”

Daniel Zylberstajn: “Can you explain a little bit, how was it like when you grew up? How was it like for most black people, in this country about this recognition?”

Kanya King: “Gosh – when I was growing up, it was very very difficult to hear my influences, I mean whether it’s Sam Cook, John Holt or Steve Wonder, I think the sales patterns and politics of music is changing, and it’s no longer niche music, it’s part of the main stream today which is very important and this is really what we were campaigning for to make sure that black music is not marginalised, like it has been done in the past.”

Kanya King organiser of the MOBO.

If MOBO would specify black musical invention that occurred at specific locations, maybe the growth of rap and hip-hop in poverty ridden black populated urban areas in the USA, It would maybe have more validity. MOBO only circles between Britain, the Caribbean and the U.S.A. Today, Hip-Hop and other music forms are made in other world locations too! Most critically, a black origin music award begs its opposite – a white award –an impossibility in contemporary Europe, except for white supremacists. Further, what exactly do the generalising words black or white people mean anyway? They seem to gain meaning only in the context of a Europe and America for several centuries prejudiced towards people of a darker complexion. In the musical context consider also that Europe’s own native musical traditions – white music in the ears of MOBO – have and are still often ridiculed as backwards and primitive, those who believe Europe is the only place with a higher culture. Perhaps what we really need is to re-evalue our understandings of music, beyond black and white?

For Deutsche Welle, I am Daniel Zylbersztajn in London.

2000 Interview with Kanya King, organizer of the MOBO award, on background and history of MOBO.

Originally aired on Cool.

recorded, presented and produced by Daniel Zylbersztajn,